10 Tips to succeed with paint on lexan

1 – The masking tape itself may have caused you some issues. I learned from a professional model builder that you should never use the 2 outside edges of the tape to define the paint border. The tape always has a reasonably rough edge which is covered with dust and other stuff that stick to the tape roll on its sides. To not use those edges, we have to create a new one. I buy a slightly wider tape (10mm), roll down a sufficient long section and stick it on a clean lexan or ABS board. Then I cut the tape in half and create two long stripes with a sharp and clean edge for masking. This way you will reach sufficient results nice side effect and double our tape live.

2 – In the event of a gradation of colors, we must begin with the darkest color to brightest colors.

Dossier Peinture Lexan




Dossier Peinture Lexan

3 – I always heat up the spray-can (or airbrush paint) by putting it on the radiator in my hobby room for 2 hours. This ensures more even mixing of components inside the can (e.g. metallic sprays) and the warm paint can faster evaporate the solvents once landed on the surface. The quicker binding and drying paint reduces tremendously the risk of bleeding and running. During summer period, a pot of warm (not hot!) water does the trick as well.
Another side effect is that the warming of the spray can does increase the internal pressure of the aerosol and this reduces dripping of the can towards its end (thick spots of paint coming out).

4 – I always apply one fine layer of color which supposed to ‘seal’ the masking tape. Once this first layer has dried, the risk of bleeding is down to 0 if your masking tape sticks to the body all along the edges. I always run along the critical edge with the backside of my thumbnail or a similar plastic piece which should not have a sharp edge to avoid tearing the tape.

5 – Put the freshly painted shell upside down on the radiator, so the shell itself warms up which reduces the drying cycle between two layers of coat. This makes your paint process more effective.
You can warm your shell even before painting it, which again supports a faster drying process reducing the risk of running or bleeding paint.

6 – In any case, should you face some minor bleeding, it does not hurt to sensitively scratch off the paint from the lexan using an Ex-acto knife. Yes, the lexan will get matt at this area, but since this is from the inside it does not hurt as long as you paint it afterwards with another color.

7 – To ensure a sharp border to the windows, I always use small black tape stripes to make body lines and window seals. This gives the car a much more realistic look.

Dossier Peinture Lexan

8 – Small punctual repairs can be done if you spray some paint in the lid of the spray can and use a brush to apply the lexan paint locally. But be careful: you may face slight color differences between spray or brush for the same paint after drying – effect by the type of application I guess.

9 – Sometimes it may be easier not to apply the masking tape along the desired border of the color. If the geometry is too difficult, first over-cover some of the area supposed to be painted with tape as well, then cut the desired geometry in the lexan and peel off the surplus tape. This works well in edges and hard corners which are beyond the tapes flexibility. The scratch from the cut in the lexan won’t be visible after painting. You may want to draw the desired geometry with a pen first so you can erase it if it does not suit your desired shape. Follow the pen with your knife and voila!

Dossier Peinture Lexan

10 – For small chrome details, use a “micro line” Special chrome.

My last advice is to be patient, do not rush!

 Matthias Schaub, DEUTSCHLAND.
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58326 Tamiya JGSDF Light Armored Vehicle

“In 1997 the Japanese Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) began development on a new high-mobility light armored transportation vehicle. Capable of accommodating 4 personnel, the JGSDF Light Armored Vehicle is fitted with a 160hp liquidcooled 4-cycle 4-cylinder diesel engine, allowing it to reach top speeds of 100km/h” (Editor’s note: description from Tamiya USA)

Tamiya released this vehicule in 2004 based on the same chassis as the Humvee. One odd thing Tamiya did with this kit, it comes pre-painted and the body is in polycarbonate.

58326 Light Armored Vehicle LAV JGSDF

The main problem is that military vehicles are generally matt/flat, and as we all know, polycarbonate has a very glossy finish. But as you can see on pictures, there is a way around this, or rather a technique to deal with the glossy body. (Editor’s note: this technique will be explained on rc4on.com in a few weeks)

58326 Light Armored Vehicle LAV JGSDF

The chassis is pretty much a standard TA01, same as the Humvee, except you get a bevel rear differential gear rather than a ball-type like the Humvee. The kit comes with an ESC, however the first version of the LAVs was sold with an MSC.

58326 Light Armored Vehicle LAV JGSDF

Short CVA oil filled shocks feature too, which are nice once you get the preload set correctly, just make sure when you place it on the ground you get a little sag/droop (just a couple of mm if that) and they’ll work beautifully.

58326 Light Armored Vehicle LAV JGSDF

The one great thing the LAV has over the Humvee is that you can press chassis down to use all the suspension travel and the wheels don’t make any contact with the body at all, whatever direction they face.

58326 Light Armored Vehicle LAV JGSDF

It is quite fast with the standard kit motor. As for a straight kit build it’s pretty good, can’t really fault it other than the front wheels tow out a little on full suspension compression, hardly noticeable when running.
Just keep running it in scale dimensions and it should last a long time and reward you with a relatively good performance.




58326 Light Armored Vehicle LAV JGSDF

This is one of those cars you never get bored of, it has lots of possibilities and potential, just feed your imagination by researching the real thing and then somehow applying it your LAV. Even if you’re not into running it, it’ll look great on the shelf if you take your time and work the body with lots of tentative patience.

The LAV along with its Humvee counter-part is what RC cars are all about: performance, modeling, choice of options and last but not least of all… fun!

By Dirt-540, UNITED KINGDOM.

More pictures in Gallerie : Tamiya 58326 JGSDF LAV

 

 

58099 Tamiya Nissan Skyline R32 GT-R

In october 1991, Tamiya releases the Nissan Skyline based on its new TA01 chassis. The car is the second of a very long series to come, the first being the Toyota Celica GT-Four. This chassis is Tamiya’s entry into the great On-Road 4WD touring family and it introduces the “TA” name that still exists.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

Unlike its successor, the TA01 is becoming rare to find in a fine condition but this one has kept its original appearance over the years. Visually, the chassis shows many colors since the gearbox covers are red, dampers are blue, the chassis is gray and the drivetrain arms are black.

Many elements were borrowed from the Manta Ray that was released one year before, so it is normal to find a ball diff in the rear gearbox. The front one got a classic differential gear with pinions.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

In order to restore its original appearance, very few work has been done to the chassis, except the addition of ball bearings and a 53127 Nissan Speed ​​Tuned Gear. The body is perfectly reproduced by Tamiya and it deserves a closer look.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

In 2009, Tamiya reissued the body of the type R32 Nissan Skyline Calsonic Gr.A. version which helped restoring this car.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

The “Box-art” decoration was made using Tamiya PS-23 Gun Metal body and X-10 for added parts such as mirrors and rear wing.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

The intercooler place has been cut in order to fit a molded plastic part available under reference 54139 Scale RC accessory.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

A detailed cockpit with pilot, helmet and harness, took place inside. The cockpit is not included with the Kit: this one was found on Internet. The windscreen wipers, optional aluminum rims (Tamiya 51131 BBS Mesh Wheels) and the exhaust pipes built with two rods of plastic add to the extra realism touch.

The original plastic rims are built in two pieces which allows to change offset.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

You should know that installing the optional Speed ​​Tuned Gear 53127 can sometimes be problematic because the rear gearbox is not compatible on the early version of TA01. The hole allowing the offset of the motor is not wide enough.

This picture shows the first gearbox version.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

The second version of the gearbox features a wider hole and a notch allowing to offset the motor axis.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

The TA01 produces a surprising noise due to its central drive shaft vibrating. The too soft suspension causes strong chassis roll when taking corners, but this doesn’t affect the scale look of the car. The original 540 is not powerful and will not exceed the chassis limit, but speed is very correct using the optional speed gear.

Tamiya 58099 Nissan Skyline

Driving this model is a real pleasure. However, it is sometimes necessary to restrict the heat on the track because you feel in confidence and can make the worst mistake of your day. It would be sad to see all this work wrecked in a second.

David from RC4on.com

More Pictures in Gallery : Nissan Skyline GTR

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